An Open Tibet - 3 of 3

Photographer, traveler

About

A photographic series prompted by the 2008 Tibetan Unrest. In particular, this is a response to fear filled government reaction to the protests and the tightening of travel restrictions on foreigners entering Tibet. I'm also pretty sure this is the photo series that causes this site to be inaccessible in China.

On Tibet

From Wikipedia

Tibet is a plateau region in Asia, north of the Himalayas, and the home to the indigenous Tibetan people and some other ethnic groups, such as Monpas and Lhobas. With an average elevation of 4,900 metres (16,000 ft), it is the highest region on Earth and has in recent decades increasingly been referred to as the "Roof of the World".

On Tibet (cont.)

During Tibet's history, it has been an independent country, divided into different countries, and a part of China each for a certain amount of time. Tibet was first unified under King Songtsän Gampo in the seventh century. A government nominally headed by the Dalai Lamas, a line of spiritual leaders, ruled a large portion of the Tibetan region at various times from the 1640s until 1950s. During most of this period, the Tibetan administration was subordinate to the Chinese empire of the Qing Dynasty. The 13th Dalai Lama proclaimed Tibet independent in 1913, but this declaration was not accepted by China, nor recognized by any country as a de jure independent nation. As a measure of the power that regents must have wielded, it is important to note that only three of the fourteen Dalai Lamas have actually ruled Tibet; regents ruled during 77 percent of the period from 1751 until 1960. The Communist Party of China gained control of central and western Tibet (Tibet area controlled by the Dalai Lama) after a decisive military victory at Chamdo in 1950. The 14th Dalai Lama fled to India in 1959.

Drepung Monestary, afternoon courtyard debate.

Nicholas D. Kristof of The New York Times has an excellent video on the post-Tibetan riot conditions at Labrang Monastery. I think his closing remarks are particularly poignant: China needs to understand that debate and protest are emblematic of national and governmental strength, not weakness.

<p><em>Drepung Monestary, afternoon courtyard debate.</em></p>  <p>Nicholas D. Kristof of The New York Times has an <a href=

Drepung Monestary, afternoon courtyard debate 2.

<p>Drepung Monestary, afternoon courtyard debate 2.</p>

Drepung Monestary, afternoon courtyard debate 3.

<p>Drepung Monestary, afternoon courtyard debate 3.</p>

Chinese tourists being photographed in front of the Jokhang Temple, Lhasa.

<p>Chinese tourists being photographed in front of the <a href=

Lhasa street scenes: the somewhat rare foreigner and Tibetan with prayer wheel

<p>Lhasa street scenes: the somewhat rare foreigner and Tibetan with <a href=

Lhasa street scenes: Man with money

<p>Lhasa street scenes: Man with money</p>

Lhasa street scenes: Woman with prayer wheel

<p>Lhasa street scenes: Woman with prayer wheel</p>

Lhasa street scenes: My favorite tree. Near the Muslim quarter.

<p>Lhasa street scenes: My favorite tree. Near the Muslim quarter. </p>

4:00 AM (GMT+8), waiting in line for tickets to Drepung to see the Sho Dun Festival (Yogurt Festival) unveiling of a giant (several stories high) thangka.

<p>4:00 AM (GMT+8), waiting in line for tickets to Drepung to see the <a href=

Near Lhasa: burning things, close to Drepung Monastery

<p>Near Lhasa: burning things, close to <a href=
 
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